Teacher’s First Jobs | Ashlyn Finkbeiner

Teacher's First Jobs

by Ashlyn Finkbeiner

We all know the feeling when we see a teacher outside of school. We feel a chill down our spine when we see that familiar face from the classroom, but why? It is because they’re our teachers, they wave to us during lunch and maybe even greet us in the parking lot, but once you see that same person walking down the aisle at the grocery store it throws us into a whole other unbearable situation. What many of us students tend to forget, and as much as it feels weird to admit it, our teachers have not always been teachers. Here are just a few of our favorite teacher jobs prior to their work here at CCA.

 

Mr. Fox worked at a fish and chips shop when he was in ninth grade. It was his first job and he states that “my brother always hated me because he had to pick me up, and his car always stank of fish and oil.” Aside from the obvious perks of de-veining shrimp for hours on end, his job paid $3.25 an hour, which he had to use to pay back the owner when he was tricked into giving someone $50 in change for a 20. Despite this, he did enjoy the free food.

 

Our very own Ms. Marquie worked with a construction company  where she hung drywall, laid tile, and painted house while she was trying to make it as an actress in San Diego.

 

Mr. Knutsson worked as a mailman in Sweden for nearly ten years. Although he says that biking in knee-high snow with giant bags of mail was not always fun, it did allow for a great workout.

 

Between the ages of 17 and 20 Mrs. Limbach had an abundance of jobs some of which include; telephone solicitor for the LA times, cleaning cabins in big bear, selling hot dogs as the Aztec Stadium, working in the cafeteria at SDSU, and as a clerk at 7/11.

 

He had many jobs prior to teaching but Mr. Lockhart describes his worst one to be counting the  hot dog sales outside of home depot. His friends boss wanted to open a hot dog stand of his own so Mr. Lockhart generously did the deed of making sure this idea would be worth his while. He stood outside for 6 hours a day for a whole week counting hot dogs.
These are only a few of the many interesting jobs that our town staff here at CCA have held in their lives. Hopefully this goes to show that contrary to popular belief, our teachers have not always been teachers.